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Sandy Shores Too
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Lake Osakis
About the Development
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Sandy Shores Too is our development on Lake Osakis in Osakis, MN. Lake Osakis is large lake spanning nearly 6500 acres. The lake is good for both fishing and recreation. There are many different species of fish in Lake Osakis, from bass to walleye. We currently have one backlot and seven lakelots available for sale ranging from $50,000 to $225,000. Click on the Blue Spruce Development logo to find the plat layout. Please contact us with any questions you may have about this development via email, or call Ben at 320-760-1712.
  Sandy Shores Too Plot Layout
     
     
     
Lake  Osakis, Osakis, MN
 

Blue Spruce Development has several lake lots and lake property on Lake Osakis   in Osakis, MN ranging from $149,000 to $229,000.  Lake Osakis is a 6,270-acre, very productive basin located along the border of Douglas and Todd counties in west-central Minnesota. The City of Osakis is located on the southwest shoreline. Maximum depth is 73.0 ft. Mean depth is 20.0 ft. Productivity is high in response to extensive, well-vegetated shallows and excessive phosphorus levels. Fifty-four percent of the lake area is less than 15.0 ft in depth. Water clarity averages 6.8 ft. during open water months. Aquatic recreational uses can be seasonally or temporarily impaired due to algae blooms.
Lake Osakis supports a diverse fish community and offers a wide range of fishing opportunities. This basin is well known for its quality walleye fishery. It is also one of the few lakes in west-central Minnesota that consistently yields large bluegill and black crappie.
Lake Osakis has historically supported a good naturally recruiting walleye population. Although walleye abundance has decreased slightly from high levels of the 1990's, survey catches remain within the upper range of expected catches for this type of lake. Supplemental fry and fingerling stockings and spawning habitat enhancements have been utilized to sustain this popular fishery. Size distribution of the walleye population is relatively good. Forty-one percent of the 2006 capture sample was greater than 15.0 inches and 20% exceeded 20.0 inches. Mean size was 15.6 inches and 1.6 pounds. Because this basin is highly fertile, walleye and most other species grow relatively fast. Walleye typically exceed 17.0 inches after four growing seasons. Size of walleye harvested is regulated with a 15.0-inch minimum length limit. All walleye less than 15.0 inches in length must be immediately released.
Key sunfish species resident to Lake Osakis include largemouth bass, bluegill, and black crappie. These populations are not abundant and annual addition of young fish to populations can be inconsistent, but they grow fast and quickly reach harvestable sizes. Average size of bluegill and black crappie captured in surveys has diminished in probable response to heavy, size selective harvest, yet fishing quality remains very good in comparison to most lakes within the Glenwood Fisheries Management Area. Fifty-five percent of largemouth bass caught during the 2006 electrofishing survey exceeded 15.0 inches in length. Nine-inch bluegill and 11.0-inch crappie were fairly common in 2006 survey catches. Fishing pressure directed at bluegill and black crappie can be heavy. Harvest statistics generated from a creel survey conducted during open water fishing season of 2002 indicated over 34,000 bluegill and almost 5,000 black crappie were harvested. Bluegill exceeding 11.0 inches and crappie exceeding 15.0 inches in length were documented in creel records. Other less abundant sunfishes in survey catches include rock bass, smallmouth bass, and pumpkinseed sunfish.
Northern pike are moderately abundant and size structure is fair to good. The largest pike measured during the 2006 surveys was 33.0 inches in length. The majority of the population is comprised of small- to medium-sized fish. Mean size of 2006 captures was 21.9 inches and 2.4 pounds. Growth is slower than anticipated given the population's modest density and the basin's exceptional productivity. The older fish captured in 2006 did not reach 30.0 inches in length until age-9. Yellow perch catch rates increased in the 2006 survey. Expansion in the preferred-prey base should improve pike growth and average size.
Lake Osakis supports other high quality fishing opportunities. Bullhead are moderately abundant and large. Fifteen-inch fish were caught during the 2006 survey. The state record yellow bullhead was caught from Lake Osakis in 2002. Lake Osakis also produced the current state record rock bass
Three public accesses are located around the lake. During low water periods these accesses can be extremely shallow. Launching larger boats can be problematic. Boaters should also be cautious of large rocks located in shallow areas south of Battle Point. These navigation hazards are marked with warning buoys. ?

Nearest Town: Osakis
Primary County: Todd
Survey Date: 08/14/2006
Inventory Number: 77021500

Buy your walleye stamp todayPurchase a walleye stamp. Your voluntary contribution will be used to support walleye stocking.

Public Access Information


Ownership

Type

Description

County

Concrete

DNR

Concrete

City

Concrete

 

Fishing Regulations:

Special and/or Experimental Fishing Regulations exist on this lake. Please refer to our online Minnesota Fishing Regulations.

Lake Characteristics


Lake Area (acres): 6389.23
Littoral Area (acres): 3416
Maximum Depth (ft): 73
Water Clarity (ft): 3.5

Dominant Bottom Substrate: N/A
Abundance of Aquatic Plants: N/A
Maximum Depth of Plant Growth (ft): N/A

Did you know? Much of Minnesota's fisheries program is reimbursed by the Federal Aid in Sport Fish Restoration Program (federal excise tax), administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Fish Sampled for the 2006 Survey Year


Species

Gear Used

Number of fish per net

Average Fish Weight (lbs)

Normal Range (lbs)

Caught

Normal Range

Black Bullhead

Trap net

0.20

0.3 - 2.1

1.61

0.4 - 0.8

Gill net

3.47

0.5 - 4.1

1.22

0.6 - 1.0

Black Crappie

Trap net

0.33

0.3 - 1.7

0.31

0.3 - 0.6

Gill net

3.40

0.2 - 1.1

0.30

0.2 - 0.5

Bluegill

Trap net

3.47

3.7 - 42.9

0.07

0.1 - 0.2

Gill net

9.47

N/A

0.25

N/A

Bowfin (dogfish)

Trap net

1.20

0.3 - 1.1

4.80

3.9 - 5.1

Gill net

0.40

0.1 - 0.2

4.26

3.0 - 5.2

Brown Bullhead

Gill net

6.60

0.3 - 1.6

1.38

0.7 - 1.2

Common Carp

Trap net

0.53

0.2 - 1.0

7.11

3.5 - 7.4

Gill net

0.47

0.1 - 0.5

4.85

3.1 - 7.1

Largemouth Bass

Trap net

0.40

0.4 - 1.4

1.44

0.3 - 0.7

Gill net

0.07

0.3 - 1.2

0.22

0.6 - 1.0

Northern Pike

Trap net

0.33

N/A

1.84

N/A

Gill net

6.33

3.0 - 7.9

2.36

1.7 - 2.8

Pumpkinseed

Trap net

1.27

1.6 - 6.9

0.06

0.1 - 0.3

Gill net

0.87

N/A

0.19

N/A

Rock Bass

Trap net

0.27

0.7 - 3.3

0.77

0.2 - 0.5

Gill net

1.00

1.0 - 6.6

0.61

0.3 - 0.5

Smallmouth Bass

Gill net

0.07

0.2 - 0.9

1.37

0.9 - 1.8

Tullibee (cisco)

Gill net

2.73

0.5 - 5.2

1.30

0.4 - 1.0

Walleye

Trap net

0.27

0.3 - 0.9

4.60

1.0 - 2.2

Gill net

8.40

4.0 - 9.6

1.61

1.1 - 1.9

White Sucker

Trap net

0.07

0.2 - 0.8

2.24

1.4 - 2.7

Gill net

0.67

1.0 - 3.5

2.78

1.5 - 2.3

Yellow Bullhead

Trap net

1.00

0.9 - 4.8

1.16

0.7 - 1.0

Gill net

23.60

0.6 - 6.4

0.96

0.6 - 0.9

Yellow Perch

Trap net

0.33

0.7 - 3.7

0.07

0.1 - 0.2

Gill net

12.13

7.1 - 33.9

0.19

0.1 - 0.2

Normal Ranges represent typical catches for lakes with similar physical and chemical characteristics.

Length of Selected Species Sampled for the 2006 Survey Year


Species

Number of fish caught in each category (inches)

0-5

6-8

9-11

12-14

15-19

20-24

25-29

30+

Total

black bullhead

0

2

4

49

0

0

0

0

55

black crappie

8

36

12

0

0

0

0

0

56

bluegill

85

107

2

0

0

0

0

0

194

bowfin (dogfish)

0

0

0

0

2

13

9

0

24

brown bullhead

0

0

3

89

7

0

0

0

99

common carp

0

0

0

1

1

9

4

0

15

largemouth bass

0

1

3

1

2

0

0

0

7

northern pike

0

0

1

2

27

52

15

3

100

pumpkinseed

22

10

0

0

0

0

0

0

32

rock bass

3

9

5

2

0

0

0

0

19

smallmouth bass

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

1

tullibee (cisco)

0

0

0

24

17

0

0

0

41

walleye

0

2

21

54

26

20

7

0

130

white sucker

0

0

0

0

9

2

0

0

11

yellow bullhead

2

14

151

201

1

0

0

0

369

yellow perch

64

96

27

0

0

0

0

0

187

For the record, the largest Tullibee taken in Minnesota weighed 5 lbs., 11.8 oz. and was caught:
Where: Little Long Lake, St. Louis County
When: 4/16/02
Statistics: 20.45" length, 16.4" girth

Fish Stocking Activity
Fish Stocked by Species for the Last Ten Years


Year

Species

Size

Number

Pounds

2009

Walleye

fry

6,828,881

68.4

 

Walleye*

fingerlings

3,800

200.0

2008

Walleye*

fingerlings

4,750

190.0

 

Walleye

fry

7,000,000

59.2

2007

Walleye

fry

7,002,076

65.1

 

Walleye*

fingerlings

12,001

406.0

2006

Walleye*

fingerlings

10,000

400.0

 

Walleye

fry

7,002,350

61.0

2005

Walleye

adults

4,341

4,452.0

 

Walleye

adults

4

10.0

 

Walleye

fingerlings

9,510

219.0

 

Walleye

fry

7,006,608

63.0

 

Walleye

yearlings

4,772

1,518.0

 

Walleye

yearlings

58

52.0

 

Walleye*

fingerlings

2,279

106.0

2004

Walleye

adults

1,684

2,289.0

 

Walleye

fingerlings

46,464

2,699.0

 

Walleye

fry

7,000,528

65.3

 

Walleye

yearlings

393

161.0

2003

Walleye

fry

6,999,494

65.8

2002

Walleye

fry

7,000,400

63.6

2001

Walleye

fry

6,640,000

62.7

2000

Walleye

fry

7,000,000

64.0

Privately Stocked Fish

* indicates privately stocked fish. Private stocking includes fish purchased by the DNR for stocking and fish purchased and stocked by private citizens and sporting groups.

Stocking Fish Sizes

Fry - Newly hatched fish that are ready to be stocked usually called "swim-ups". Walleye fry are 1/3 of an inch or around 8 mm.

Fingerling - Fingerlings are one to six months old and can range from a size of one to twelve inches depending on the species. Walleye fingerlings range from three to eight inches each fall.

Yearling - Yearling fish are at least one year old. A one-year-old fish can range from three to twenty inches depending on the species. Walleye yearlings average from six to twelve inches.

Adult - Adult fish are fish that have reached maturity. Depending on the species, maturity can be reached at two years of age. Walleye reach maturity between the ages of four and six years.

Fish Consumption Guidelines
These fish consumption guidelines help people make choices about which fish to eat and how often. Following the guidelines enables people to reduce their exposure to contaminants while still enjoying the many benefits from fish.
Pregnant Women, Women who may become pregnant and Children under age 15


LAKE NAME
County, DOWID

Species

Meal Advice

Contaminants

Unrestricted

1 meal/week

1 meal/month

Do not eat

OSAKIS
Todd Co., 77021500

Bluegill Sunfish

 

All sizes

 

 

Mercury

Northern Pike

 

 

All sizes

 

Mercury

Walleye

 

 

All sizes

 

Mercury

White Sucker

 

All sizes

 

 

Mercury

General Population


LAKE NAME
County, DOWID

Species

Meal Advice

Contaminants

Unrestricted

1 meal/week

1 meal/month

Do not eat

OSAKIS
Todd Co., 77021500

Bluegill Sunfish

All sizes

 

 

 

 

Northern Pike

 

All sizes

 

 

Mercury

Walleye

 

All sizes

 

 

Mercury

White Sucker

All sizes

 

 

 

 

DOWID - MN DNR, Divion of Waters' lake ID number.
Contaminants listed were measured at levels high enough to warrant a recommendation to limit consumption.
Listing of consumption guidelines do not imply the fish are legal to keep, MN DNR fishing regulations should be consulted.
Dioxin
Mercury
PCBS - Polychlorinated biphenyls
PFOS - Perfluorooctane sulfanate

Status of the Fishery (as of 08/14/2006)
Lake Osakis is a 6,270-acre, very productive basin located along the border of Douglas and Todd counties in west-central Minnesota. The City of Osakis is located on the southwest shoreline. Maximum depth is 73.0 ft. Mean depth is 20.0 ft. Productivity is high in response to extensive, well-vegetated shallows and excessive phosphorus levels. Fifty-four percent of the lake area is less than 15.0 ft in depth. Water clarity averages 6.8 ft. during open water months. Aquatic recreational uses can be seasonally or temporarily impaired due to algae blooms.
Lake Osakis supports a diverse fish community and offers a wide range of fishing opportunities. This basin is well known for its quality walleye fishery. It is also one of the few lakes in west-central Minnesota that consistently yields large bluegill and black crappie.
Lake Osakis has historically supported a good naturally recruiting walleye population. Although walleye abundance has decreased slightly from high levels of the 1990's, survey catches remain within the upper range of expected catches for this type of lake. Supplemental fry and fingerling stockings and spawning habitat enhancements have been utilized to sustain this popular fishery. Size distribution of the walleye population is relatively good. Forty-one percent of the 2006 capture sample was greater than 15.0 inches and 20% exceeded 20.0 inches. Mean size was 15.6 inches and 1.6 pounds. Because this basin is highly fertile, walleye and most other species grow relatively fast. Walleye typically exceed 17.0 inches after four growing seasons. Size of walleye harvested is regulated with a 15.0-inch minimum length limit. All walleye less than 15.0 inches in length must be immediately released.
Key sunfish species resident to Lake Osakis include largemouth bass, bluegill, and black crappie. These populations are not abundant and annual addition of young fish to populations can be inconsistent, but they grow fast and quickly reach harvestable sizes. Average size of bluegill and black crappie captured in surveys has diminished in probable response to heavy, size selective harvest, yet fishing quality remains very good in comparison to most lakes within the Glenwood Fisheries Management Area. Fifty-five percent of largemouth bass caught during the 2006 electrofishing survey exceeded 15.0 inches in length. Nine-inch bluegill and 11.0-inch crappie were fairly common in 2006 survey catches. Fishing pressure directed at bluegill and black crappie can be heavy. Harvest statistics generated from a creel survey conducted during open water fishing season of 2002 indicated over 34,000 bluegill and almost 5,000 black crappie were harvested. Bluegill exceeding 11.0 inches and crappie exceeding 15.0 inches in length were documented in creel records. Other less abundant sunfishes in survey catches include rock bass, smallmouth bass, and pumpkinseed sunfish.
Northern pike are moderately abundant and size structure is fair to good. The largest pike measured during the 2006 surveys was 33.0 inches in length. The majority of the population is comprised of small- to medium-sized fish. Mean size of 2006 captures was 21.9 inches and 2.4 pounds. Growth is slower than anticipated given the population's modest density and the basin's exceptional productivity. The older fish captured in 2006 did not reach 30.0 inches in length until age-9. Yellow perch catch rates increased in the 2006 survey. Expansion in the preferred-prey base should improve pike growth and average size.
Lake Osakis supports other high quality fishing opportunities. Bullhead are moderately abundant and large. Fifteen-inch fish were caught during the 2006 survey. The state record yellow bullhead was caught from Lake Osakis in 2002. Lake Osakis also produced the current state record rock bass
Three public accesses are located around the lake. During low water periods these accesses can be extremely shallow. Launching larger boats can be problematic. Boaters should also be cautious of large rocks located in shallow areas south of Battle Point. These navigation hazards are marked with warning buoys. ?

 

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