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Reno Southside
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Lake Reno
About the Development
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We currently have 6 lots available in the Reno Southside Estates Development. These lots range from $129,900 to $139,900 depending on lot size and lakeshore quality. Reno is a fairly large sized lake, second largest in pope County, at about 3800 acres leaving plenty of room for fishermen and casual boaters alike. Lake Reno is a great walleye and sunfish lake for those looking to catch a meal. It is located between Alexandria and Glenwood just off Hwy 29. Click on the Blue Spruce Development logo to find the plat layout. Please contact us with any questions you may have about this development via email, or call Ben at 320-760-1712.
   
     
    Reno Southside Plot Layout
     

Lake  Reno
 

Blue Spruce Development has several   lake lots left  on Lake Reno prices ranging from only $135,000 to $159,000.  Lake Reno is a 3,722-acre, highly productive lake located between Glenwood and Alexandria. It is the second largest lake in Pope County. An extended high water period that began in the mid-80s greatly reduced submerging and emergent vegetation diversity and coverage. Water quality suffered with increased run-off. Game fishes dependent upon vegetated habitat and clear water, i.e. northern pike, largemouth bass, bluegill, and yellow perch were suppressed. Water clarity has steadily improved since the late-90s. Average summer transparency measurements now approach 9.0 ft. Correspondingly, vegetative abundance and diversity have increased. In response, the fish community has transcending back from a relatively simple walleye fishery to a more diversified fishery.
Lake Reno is well known as a good walleye lake. Walleye are very abundant due to natural reproduction and solid performance of supplemental fry stockings. Average catch rates in surveys dating back to 1989 have been well above expected catches for similar lakes. Population density is at or exceeded the lake's capacity to support such high numbers, particularly with expansion of other game fish populations. Walleye growth has slowed. A three-year-old walleye captured during the 1998 survey exceeded 15.0 inches in length. In 2006, the same age fish averaged only 12.4 inches. Walleye ages 1, 4, 5, and 10 comprised most of the total catch. Four- and five-year old walleye averaged 17.0 inches. Cohorts of the sizeable 10-year-old age group averaged 21.5 inches in length at time of capture. Age distribution of 2006 walleye captures extended out to 14 years-of-age.
The yellow perch population exploded in the late-90s. Average gillnet catches during 1998, 2002, and 2006 have been two to three times greater than normal for such lakes. Perch catches in 2006 averaged 120.0 fish/gillnet. Walleye were presented with an abundance of young-of- year perch to consume. High perch abundance at times can reduce walleye angling success. Young walleye were also competing with adult perch and expanding sunfish populations for food and space. Most yellow perch are young and small, but good numbers of larger fish (8.0-10.0 inches) and a few "jumbos" (over 12.0 inches) are also present. These large perch can augment fishing success.
Sunfish species have benefited most with improving water quality and expansion of submergent and emergent vegetation. Record-high bluegill and black crappie catches were documented in 2006. Size structure of both populations was skewed towards a smaller average size in response to high proportion of young fish in both populations. Modest numbers of large bluegill and crappie were recorded. If current growth rates can be sustained, size structure of both populations will likely improve in future years as the abundant smaller fish grow into the fishery. Largemouth bass abundance has not kept pace with that of bluegill, but modest population expansion is evident in electrofishing catch rates. Fishing quality, in terms of average size of bass, should be good. Eighty-one percent of 8.0 inch and larger bass captured in 2006 exceeded 15.0 inches in length. Mean size captured was 13.2 inches and averaged 1.7 pounds. Other sunfishes, specifically rock bass and pumpkinseed sunfish have become much more abundant.
Northern pike abundance has been relatively stable since the mid-1980s. Gillnet catches averaged 3.5 fish/gillnet in 2006. Even though preferred-prey, yellow perch, were very abundant, pike growth was slow. Correspondingly, few large fish were observed. Some expansion is likely with improving water quality and increased vegetation.
Near-term fishing attributes will be exceptional. Generalist anglers will value greater diversity of fishing experiences. Walleye anglers will likely be frustrated by a net decrease in abundance and average size accompanying community expansion. It will be interesting to monitor evolution of Lake Reno's fishery.

Nearest Town: Alexandria
Primary County: Pope
Survey Date: 07/10/2006
Inventory Number: 61007800

 

Public Access Information


Ownership

Type

Description

DNR

Concrete

DNR

Concrete

 

Fish Health:

Disease:

Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia (VHS)

Date Tested:

4/13/2010

Result:

Negative

Source:

UMN


Lake Characteristics

Lake Area (acres): 3793.63
Littoral Area (acres): 1303
Maximum Depth (ft): 23
Water Clarity (ft): 6

Dominant Bottom Substrate: N/A
Abundance of Aquatic Plants: N/A
Maximum Depth of Plant Growth (ft): N/A

Did you know? Minnesota waters support 153 species of fish.

Fish Sampled for the 2006 Survey Year


Species

Gear Used

Number of fish per net

Average Fish Weight (lbs)

Normal Range (lbs)

Caught

Normal Range

Black Bullhead

Trap net

0.13

0.3 - 2.6

1.33

0.5 - 0.9

Gill net

7.93

0.6 - 6.8

1.55

0.5 - 1.0

Black Crappie

Trap net

6.47

0.4 - 2.3

0.14

0.3 - 0.6

Gill net

9.73

0.4 - 2.7

0.22

0.3 - 0.6

Bluegill

Trap net

63.80

4.4 - 49.0

0.10

0.1 - 0.2

Gill net

3.53

N/A

0.21

N/A

Bowfin (dogfish)

Trap net

0.80

0.3 - 1.1

4.68

3.7 - 5.1

Brown Bullhead

Trap net

0.27

0.3 - 1.6

1.53

0.7 - 1.1

Gill net

1.07

0.3 - 1.8

1.43

0.7 - 1.2

Common Carp

Trap net

0.27

0.2 - 1.0

8.43

3.8 - 8.7

Gill net

0.07

0.2 - 1.0

0.90

2.3 - 8.2

Golden Shiner

Trap net

0.13

0.1 - 0.3

0.06

0.1 - 0.2

Green Sunfish

Trap net

0.07

0.2 - 1.0

0.19

0.1 - 0.2

Hybrid Sunfish

Trap net

0.27

N/A

0.36

N/A

Gill net

0.47

N/A

0.18

N/A

Largemouth Bass

Trap net

3.40

0.3 - 1.3

0.17

0.2 - 0.8

Gill net

0.07

0.3 - 1.4

0.08

0.5 - 1.2

Northern Pike

Trap net

0.13

N/A

3.33

N/A

Gill net

3.53

2.8 - 9.0

2.92

1.6 - 2.8

Pumpkinseed

Trap net

8.67

1.8 - 7.8

0.10

0.1 - 0.3

Gill net

12.13

N/A

0.12

N/A

Rock Bass

Trap net

1.33

0.5 - 2.5

0.21

0.3 - 0.5

Gill net

9.07

0.6 - 3.9

0.35

0.3 - 0.5

Shorthead Redhorse

Gill net

0.07

0.2 - 0.9

4.20

1.1 - 2.2

Walleye

Trap net

0.60

0.2 - 0.8

1.88

1.0 - 2.7

Gill net

16.87

3.3 - 8.8

2.22

1.2 - 2.1

White Sucker

Gill net

5.80

0.9 - 4.0

2.36

1.6 - 2.4

Yellow Bullhead

Trap net

0.07

1.2 - 5.2

1.49

0.6 - 0.9

Gill net

2.33

1.2 - 10.9

0.66

0.6 - 0.9

Yellow Perch

Trap net

2.53

0.6 - 3.5

0.13

0.1 - 0.2

Gill net

120.00

7.0 - 46.3

0.14

0.1 - 0.2

Normal Ranges represent typical catches for lakes with similar physical and chemical characteristics.

Length of Selected Species Sampled for the 2006 Survey Year


Species

Number of fish caught in each category (inches)

0-5

6-8

9-11

12-14

15-19

20-24

25-29

30+

Total

black bullhead

0

5

12

84

20

0

0

0

121

black crappie

117

100

13

13

0

0

0

0

243

bluegill

831

172

1

0

0

0

0

0

1010

bowfin (dogfish)

0

0

0

0

3

5

3

1

12

brown bullhead

0

2

1

11

6

0

0

0

20

common carp

0

0

1

1

0

0

2

1

5

golden shiner

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

green sunfish

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

hybrid sunfish

6

4

1

0

0

0

0

0

11

largemouth bass

28

19

5

0

0

0

0

0

52

northern pike

0

0

0

0

11

29

14

1

55

pumpkinseed

262

46

0

0

0

0

0

0

312

rock bass

35

99

22

0

0

0

0

0

156

shorthead redhorse

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

1

walleye

0

21

17

7

150

62

5

0

262

white sucker

0

1

6

6

68

5

1

0

87

yellow bullhead

0

6

20

10

0

0

0

0

36

yellow perch

632

1097

93

3

0

0

0

0

1838

For the record, the largest Tullibee taken in Minnesota weighed 5 lbs., 11.8 oz. and was caught:
Where: Little Long Lake, St. Louis County
When: 4/16/02
Statistics: 20.45" length, 16.4" girth

Fish Stocking Activity
Fish Stocked by Species for the Last Ten Years


Year

Species

Size

Number

Pounds

2009

Walleye

fry

516,384

4.5

 

Walleye

fry

1,439,852

14.6

 

Walleye*

yearlings

16,000

500.0

2008

Walleye

fry

999,221

10.0

 

Walleye*

fry

1,150,050

10.5

2007

Walleye*

fry

1,900,000

16.9

 

Walleye

fry

224,740

2.0

2005

Walleye*

fry

1,974,979

17.8

2002

Walleye

fry

1,980,000

18.0

2001

Walleye

fry

1,755,000

16.5

2000

Walleye

fry

1,950,000

17.8

Privately Stocked Fish

* indicates privately stocked fish. Private stocking includes fish purchased by the DNR for stocking and fish purchased and stocked by private citizens and sporting groups.

Stocking Fish Sizes

Fry - Newly hatched fish that are ready to be stocked usually called "swim-ups". Walleye fry are 1/3 of an inch or around 8 mm.

Fingerling - Fingerlings are one to six months old and can range from a size of one to twelve inches depending on the species. Walleye fingerlings range from three to eight inches each fall.

Yearling - Yearling fish are at least one year old. A one-year-old fish can range from three to twenty inches depending on the species. Walleye yearlings average from six to twelve inches.

Adult - Adult fish are fish that have reached maturity. Depending on the species, maturity can be reached at two years of age. Walleye reach maturity between the ages of four and six years.

Fish Consumption Guidelines
No fish consumption guidelines are available for this lake. For more information, see the "Fish Consumption Advice" pages at the Minnesota Department of Health.

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